Book Review: Nora Bonesteel’s Christmas Past

I don’t want to get spanked, so again I have to inform you I received an advanced copy with the quid pro quo of writing an honest review.

It’s logical to make the assumption that something written by Sharyn McCrumb would be a mystery. As someone who was a huge fan of her Elizabeth McPhearson series, but not so much her more serious work, I was willing to give it a shot simply because when a writer has been so entertaining in the past, you give them the benefit of the doubt.

So I won’t try to deny that it was very disappointing to find there was no mystery to be solved in this novella. I was about halfway through when I realized that, and though I enjoyed the story once I reset my expectations, I am forced to admit the assumption does color my experience with this tome.

My favorite feature about Ms. McCrumb’s writing is the humor, particularly that inherent in the Appalachian region (and make sure you pronounce that right!). I don’t know if these are old sayings or she comes up with them herself, but stuff like “I swear that part of the county is only on the map two days a week” just make my day. Another example is when Nora is daydreaming, but since only kids do that, she calls it “woolgathering.” Another one that made me giggle was “Colder than a penguin’s butt.”

So the novella consists of two stories, and never the twain shall meet. The title refers to Nora being asked by her non-native neighbors to do a sorta exorcism–on a pink metal Christmas tree–in their new home, while the other has the Sheriff and his top deputy heading out on a cold and soon-to-be-snowy night to arrest a hit-and-run driver, having to do so NOW for political reasons. As always Sheriff Arrowwood is sunshine personified and LeDonne his usual dour self; this passage encapsulates the characters perfectly: His cheery attitude did nothing to ease LaDonne’s vigilance; as he was fond of saying, “Crocodiles smile.” There’s also a very humorous description of how to get cows to do what you want them to, even when they don’t want to, and LaDonne definitely does not like being thought of as an angel. Unfortunately, I figured out where this was going about halfway through.

As for the other story–I hesitate to call either plots–the newly-neighbors couple of Shirley and Bill are too cool to believe in ghosts and such, but figure it can’t hurt to have someone of Miss Bonesteel’s rep come in and give advice as to why the Christmas tree is behaving so ornery. As Shirley pondered, “Nothing and nobody in these mountains took well to following rules. She was willing to believe that around here scientific logic might get outvoted.” In addition to seeing ghosts, Nora is also precognitive, which any oracle from ancient literature can tell you is a curse; bad enough that people refuse to believe, but then they like to blame the messenger when it comes true, calling her a witch or worse. We see that when we get a flashback to World War Two, which has a direct bearing on what’s going on now.

So again, no mystery to solve here. Perhaps if you go in knowing that, without expectation, you’ll enjoy it more, as I’m sure I would have. Possibly it would serve as a good introduction for those who’ve never read this fine author.

 

This did not play a part in the review or the rating, but feel like I have to mention it. As far as the ebook proof I was given to read, this is the second book that has trouble with ff, fl, and fi, and the way it seemed to be resolved was to ignore it completely, which turns sheriff into sheri; I have no doubt he would love that. . . except “th” is also missing. Slows down the reading while you figure out what was meant.

;o)

 

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