Book Reviews: Mounds of Kiddie Stuff

“I did my doody,” the toddler intoned solemnly, then grinned.
“He might be a prodigy after all. . .”

Sun Dragon’s Song #2
I’ve read the first, and more importantly remember it; that doesn’t happen often.
Despite now being a dragonrider in training—or more likely because of it—Ho Yi is still getting bullied. Before he was just an easy target, but now jealousy gets added and he gets a huge beatdown. Much more endearing is how much he likes his new digs: not having to share a room, his own bathroom, so on. That changes quickly as training sets in, leaving him homesick and in pain, but with new friends.
You can’t be a dragonrider if you’re afraid of heights; maybe shoulda thought about that beforehand. . .
I like the artwork here more than I did in the first one. I don’t remember if the first was so watercolor-y, but it definitely works here.
Ends in a cliffhanger, but since it’s the 2nd of 4 chapters that’s to be expected.
3.5/5

New York City Monsters
Bright landscapes of Noo Yawk are interspersed with info bubbles and monsters for you to find in a Where’s Waldo fashion. Some are pretty tricky, like the one dressed in a business suit on the street. Toward the end I missed some, much to my everlasting chagrin; some three-year-old is bound to find it and make my embarrassment complete.
4/5

Princess Lila Builds a Tower
A young version of Rapunzel—shorter blonde hair, of course—is sad; much like Buddha, she has everything she wants but is not allowed to go outside. So she gets the great idea to build an observation tower, seemingly modeled after the one in Copenhagen, so she can see past the dangerous forest she’s forbidden from entering.
Personality trait that will tell you all you need to know about her: “Princess Lila blushed with happiness.” Though she doesn’t even take the crown off to sleep. And in the end she finds a friend with a much bigger crown than hers.
The print is a bit small, despite having plenty of room in the beautiful page-size drawings.
3.5/5

The Bear
Learn about ursines in question and answer method. Example:
WHERE DOES THE BEAR LIVE?
There are rocks, trees…. And look! There’s a cave!
Nicely descriptive without getting verbose. I’m liking this for adults, other than the simple language, though it’s perfect for kids. Small and simple but bright colorful paintings tell most of the story.
Facts and glossary at the end.
4/5

Mama Bird Papa Bird
In full page drawings with few words, the story of how a pair of birds suddenly find an egg in their nest is told. They have no idea how it got there. Mama got fat and then she wasn’t. (What exactly is the attempted lesson here?)
At some point it occurred to me there was rhyming going on, but it didn’t hit me at the beginning, which is unusual.
Ends with the parents squabbling over baby’s career path, so to speak. But after that there’s a bible bit that seems to imply the whole book was about keeping to old-fashioned gender roles. What was a simple and almost-boring story becomes rather chilling.
As usually happens, the artwork is the best part, though the birds smile way too smugly.
2/5

Chicago Monsters
Each page of this book contains monsters, not many of them scary; it’s up to your kid—or you—to find them. Period. That’s all there is to this, and it’s beautiful. Some are of course easy, but it’s hard to get them all on the first try, especially in the latter pages.
Since this is the Chicago version they start with the Bean. Not as many well-known places as the NY edition; can’t wait for them to get to El Lay.
The whole thing is done in big bright colors that make it a joy to look through.
4/5

San Francisco Monsters
As always, each page contains not-always-scary monsters to find. That’s the entire game, and really all you need. Each setting is brightly colored yet realistic, as the Golden Gate Bridge, Painted Ladies, and brickwork of Ghirardelli Square attest to.
Maybe it’s the locale, but I enjoyed this one a little more than the previous editions in Chicago or Noo Yawk.
4/5

My Favorite Word: Arcane
Text alternates with paintings as a little girl—seemingly too little to know a word like that—tells of how she wishes her friends would be nicer to her, even if it takes arcane magic.
The poor dog is wondering what she’s doing with his bones.
It’s definitely cute and worthwhile, but I’m not sure the target audience would learn the actual meaning of the word through this. It’s not exactly spelled out, and seems to be used for many different things throughout.
3/5

Little Tails in the Savannah
As with the first, a squirrel takes a relatively dimwit dog for a trip to find out about animals. As the title tells you, this one takes place in Africa. Each page contains a three-panel comic strip with a full color painting of the animal discussed taking up most of the page.
What kind of plane gets destroyed crashing into a giraffe? A cardboard one, of course. And yes, that ball is a pile of poo. Great start. . .
Baby elephant grabbing mom’s tail=intense cuteness.
Bit of an abrupt ending; barely got to say hi to the uncle they were visiting before they were gone again in their somehow fixed air machine. Would have preferred a few more pages to make the ending better.
3.5/5

The Knights of Boo’Gar
A spoiled princess interrupts a ridiculous chess-like game between the king and his wizard—best thing that could have happened to it—to wail that the royal goat has been stolen, possibly by a cheese lover.
Example of the kind of line you can expect here: “She sobbed and sobbed, just like anyone would if they lost their goat.” The narrator’s princess-y attitude, along with the wizard’s snark. . . the king would have called it subversive, if it didn’t go over his head.
Childish puns abound. My favorite character early on, as expected, is the turtle, who likes to watch her human go crazy. (But I haven’t met the goat yet.) The princess is not just wearing a tool belt, but her favorite tool belt. (Yet she’s still majorly spoiled!) Lest you forget this is for kids, there’s plenty of boogers and farts.
“We have names and feelings just like you. We not just scary plot device.” This author really wants to get something off his chest, but then that’s no surprise when he makes religious figures the bad guys.
There’s a chapter at the end on medieval devices, which doesn’t seem to fit the story.
With only a few cartoony drawings, mostly of the king, amongst the large-print prose, it’s not enough to call this a picture book. What it is is a silly and occasionally funny story for pre-teens.
3.5/5

Sea Creatures: Reef Madness #1
Awesome subtitle that kids won’t get.
Sunday comic strip-like cartoons explain the quirks of different types of fish, with a twist comical—or attempt at comedy—ending. All the creatures think and speak, and for the most part get along, though there’s always some bad guys.
The thought of a humpback whale approaching discreetly blows my mind. . . especially while singing (though as I remember he only sings when mating).
The humor is mostly groan-inducing if you’re over 12, but since this book is meant for younger than that, it feels right. Can’t help but think, though, since this was originally done in French, something was lost in the translation.
3.5/5

The Smurfs: The Village Behind the Wall
A collection of shorts stories featuring the usual guys and one gal finding a new group of blue girls, apparently as an introduction to the new movie coming out soon! (said in announcer voice).
All the new Smurfs get a full page intro—awesome.
The new gals are terrific dancers, and good at curing the aches and pains afterward. “Hanging out with girls looks smurfly exhausting.” If you only knew, bro. . . so much for being the smart one.
Hefty is, as always, easily manipulated. “Why do I have the impression that’s exactly what she wanted?” Because you’ve never talked to a girl before, dude?
A kissing flower gets slapped for being forward. Almost feel sorry for it, considering how sad it’s drawn.
I hate it when the character is narrating what’s obviously happening, as occurred in one of the last stories. At least make it an inner monologue.
A few pages at the end tell how the Smurfs first appeared, with the humans in the story pretty much asking the same questions I did.
3.5/5

;o)

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