Book Reviews: For the Kid In You

“Did you say hell pit or help it?”

Sarah at the Wedding
A little girl and boy are thrilled to participate in a wedding. The book takes you through all the stages from the kids’ point of view.
First of all, the little girl on the cover is so adorable, thrilled to be kissed. And before the story starts there’s a page of various items that might be found at a wedding, with questions like “What did they eat?” and my fave, “What did Dad lose?”
As expected it’s a simple telling, for kids who have never been to a wedding. The best part would obviously be getting to eat cake at the reception, as well as blowing bubbles and staying up late. There’s even an arts and crafts table at the reception, which is a new one to me. Everything’s done in a very cute style, with bright colors.
At the end there’s a page that shows how to make a veil and top hat, for all those play weddings kids love to do.
4/5

A Puppy’s Dream Comes True
A tiny dog narrates how he’s afraid of humans because they’re so big. He falls for a cute redhead and happily goes home with her, especially when he finds the shoe closet. What he can’t find, however, is a bathroom. And he gets named BabyDoll, which is fitting, because “I love looking cute!” The artwork feels like it’s out of the 60s, which makes the dog’s thoughts all the more interesting.
Then things turn weird. For one thing, this is a rich famous couple that walks red carpets. When they talked about adopting a baby girl—human, though it doesn’t make it clear—I thought Jolie or Madonna. And at the end there’s a message to help adopt children, which starts with “Thank you for your interest in our foundation.”
Um. . . what foundation? I thought I was reading about a dog. What does that have to do with a foundation? Great idea, so why not write about the joy of adopting a human? But I suppose the story is for kids and only the last page is for adults. Still, jarring enough to take me out of the enjoyment and drop it a point.
3/5

Georgie Makes a New Friend
A boy made out of gingerbread lives in a house made of sugar cookies—not gingerbread, because he’s weird, it’s pointed out—in the forest. Georgie didn’t like doing anything that was expected. He meets a nutcracker wisely named Bartholomew, who is just as unconventional as Georgie. They’re not all that smart, being easily distracted and trapped by a toymaker who wants to make them conventional.
Cute enough, though it feels really weird to have a gingerbread creature eating muffins. The theme of being yourself could have been tighter.
3/5

Sun Kisses, Moon Hugs
Short but sweet picture book showing how to deal with separation anxiety. Moonbeams, sunrays, rainbows are all used to carry love.
This may be the best children’s book I’ve ever read. Beautifully drawn, beautiful colors, great writing, especially the rhyming.
5/5

Beautifully Different
A paean to the joys of daydreaming and inclusion as a little boy wonders why some people make fun of others just because they look or act different. His father directs a daydream in which he flies to a world full of flowers and helps them survive a weed attack.
Bright colors, exaggerated human features. But what was the point of the gate?
4/5

Dreamland with Mommy
Imagination Time Travel: Mom directs her little son’s dreaming, but lets him choose the details, such as diving into a giant cherry pie and getting showered by elephants. The main point is solving a riddle, which from the end notes appears to be from the Koran. Not sure how many kids would have been able to solve it, or adults, for that matter.
Sometimes it rhymes, but not always.
3.5/5

A Cup of Tea?
Kid wants to play with his parents, who are too tired when they get home from work. At other times it seems like it’s going to happen when another interruption takes place, with tea always a part of it.
The artwork is watercolor-y and a bit strange, even though it’s mostly in a style I’ve seen from other children’s books. The writing is small and hard to read, at least on the electronic version. There is excellent rhyming, which is becoming a lost art. “Once again my adventures were undone by a kettle/it gets so much use now I know why it’s metal.” Wonder if a kid that young would know what a kettle is, or at least the name for it, but okay.
Can’t help but think that if this was written in the US, it would be a beer instead of tea.
Hadn’t realized I’d read another book by this same author; just like this one is about tea, that one was chocolate. This is a cute story, but I think the chocolate one was better.
3.5/5

Ya know what?
When a story starts in the bathroom it can only go up from there. Little Oliver would rather talk than go to sleep, and luckily for him he has a patient mom! Especially for a redhead. He’s also got all kinds of cute stuffed animals, which made it easy to understand why he wasn’t afraid of what was under the bed; good reveal of what was really going on under there.
“For little chatterboxes age 4 and up.” Perfect description.
Incredibly cute in all ways.
4/5

Welcome Home, Beaver
Already on the cover there’s a lot of stuff going on, but. . . why do beavers need scuba gear?
An adventurous young beaver—dressed like a lumberjack, of course—is on a log, rowing along a giant city with skyscrapers. Quickly he becomes homesick, so Akita the Adventure Dog! (must have exclamation point) takes him around the world in his balloon searching for it. I hope Akita is doing it on purpose, because if he can’t tell there’s no way Beaver could possibly live in a honeycomb then he’s the dumbest superhero ever.
Again, there’s a lot going on in each artwork. My fave is when they’re in the Arctic and the seals are playing ring toss with a narwhal. On another page there’s a prairie dog playing the accordion—that’s just evil.
On the other hand, some of this background material, added to make things funny, isn’t very realistic. (Yes, this is about a beaver and a dog in a balloon going around the world, but still.) For example, Fox has three kids in his cave. . . and a liquor cabinet with the bottles on top, where anyone can get at them. And a pantry but no real kitchen. Maybe it’s more my attention to detail that’s at fault here. I supposed the author/artist doesn’t expect kids to catch all this. For them it will be fine and fun—don’t want anyone to think this sucks in any way—just felt like a little more thought could have been put into the details.
The couplets certainly rhyme, though forget about the meter. Don’t know how big this real-tree book will be, but the print is tiny. (This rhyming stuff is catching!)
At the end there’s a map of all the places they visited.
3/5

This Is a Book Full of Monsters (or This Book Is Full of Monsters)
With this title, there’s nothing else I need to tell you. With books like these I have to keep reminding myself they’re for children, as sometimes the most painfully obvious thing is spelled out. For example, the very first page says if you get scared you can stop reading at any time.
Monsters are cute when they’re babies, but even then have sharp teeth. Some monsters get you with their smell, others with their banshee wail. But yeah, that slime guy might be the worst of all.
At the end there’s a certificate for making it through.
Wasn’t sold on this. Not all the monsters were given a “superpower” of evil, so to speak. Some were simply mentioned as looking scary, though they really didn’t look it. I read another of this author’s books, where a dog has to find a place to go potty, and frankly that felt scarier.
2.5/5

But I Wanted a Little Sister
Title says it all, doesn’t it?
“My brother always smiles. He never cries.” True. That is the calmest baby ever. It takes going around to see what little sisters are like for her to appreciate her brother.
I am going to be accused of thinking of things too logically, but it’s what I do. And this was never set as a fantasy, completely made to look like real life, where you don’t get adults saying, “We don’t sell babies. Perhaps you should try next door.” Wow. This little girl is pushing her brother in a tram all around town and no one wonders where Mom or Dad might be? By now I’m familiar with this author, who has done much better than this elsewhere.
3/5

My Name Is Caillou
In what could be called a prequel, the latest in this long series goes back to the beginning, with the little imp introducing himself to say he’s just like you.
The best part is how it shows his parents thinking of his name before he was born. Another is the pride he takes in now being big and able to dress himself.
Simple “Day in the life of a little kid” story.
3.5/5

;o)

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