Moonlit Kit Video Shoot Photos

So last Saturday I found myself heading to what eventually turned out to be a small horse ranch near Vasquez Rocks, north of Los Angeles. There was a small stage, a rickety gazebo, and a few horses along with some fans and friends of the band who’d come to help shoot the video for Moonlit Kit’s new song, Simple Ways.
I volunteered mostly because I thought it’d be fun, and because I haven’t been on a shoot in a long time, but also because Kit Nolan is Lindsey Stirling‘s keyboardist/guitarist whom I’d briefly met at her concert last year. Seemed like a cool guy, and I liked the song, so why not? I didn’t expect Lindsey’s drummer Drew Steen to show up as well, but that just made for all the more fun.

Okay, on to the visual beauty:

This band has both flair and flare.

Director Christine likes close-ups

Too many jokes to settle on just one.

Daniel often has to duck under the bass.

Drew chillin’ with Kit’s replacement should Moonlit Kit hit it big.

Kelly doing her strut to the stage.

Violin Bass Guitar.

Kit showing off the heroic chin.

Gazebo decorations.

Ryan into his jam.

Tyler workin’ the bun.

;o)

Travel Thursday Snapshot: La Plaza Mexican-American Museum

Today’s travel only took me an hour from home, but since I went after visiting my mother at the nursing home, it felt like a lot longer.
This museum is located across the street from the Plaza in downtown Los Angeles—itself across the street from Union Station—which is most famous for containing Olvera Street. If any of you bothered to read my one and only food review, you’d know that place was Juanita’s, right here on Olvera Street, so that had to be the first stop. It’s easy to tell when you’ve been to a restaurant a lot when the moment they see you they yell to the kitchen, “Bean and cheese burrito!” I had to straighten them out: “That’s just my nickname, not my real name.”
After some talk with the owner about missing Comic-Con, I set off for my usual after-burrito soft serve, then on to the museum, which is across the street from the gazebo, almost next to the church, if you count the open area between them. The first thing I found out was that it’s free, though there is a donation box. The young lady behind the desk smiled and told me what I could expect and to make sure not to use a flash if I took photos. Sounded a little rehearsed, but I wasn’t going to hold that against her.
So on to the many displays on the first floor, reminiscent of the museum style of the Autry Museum of the West in Griffith Park. The first part deals with social issues, like racism in the 40s and school segregation.

After that it’s more about the history of the area, including videos and sound bites. Also on the ground floor is a space for art exhibits, the current one concerning art works from those who refer to themselves as Latinx artists, which is a term I’m unfamiliar with but apparently stands as either gender-neutral form of “Latin” or LGBT for Hispanics. . . or possibly both. There were a couple of particularly intriguing works, as well as quotes; the one that really made me laugh was the guy calling Frieda Kahlo the original Queen of Selfies.


On the second floor is a space, again reminiscent of the Autry, made up of store fronts, the most popular for me of course being the photo studio; now I know what my professional life would have been like 100 years ago. The other favorite was the book store—remember, kiddies, in Spanish Liberia does not mean Library; that’s Biblioteca—which also sold music. The grocery store was fun too, as I looked for things I might like and had to settle for vanilla—spelled differently here—chamomile, and cinnamon.


So, overall not a bad way to spend a couple of hours, especially in the heat of summer. I might have to cross the street and get another soft serve from the lady that’s always reading. . .

;o)

Poetry Tuesday: Villon’s Quatrain

By Francois Villon, 1431-1463.

(Not sure how accurate this translation from the French is, considering it rhymes in English.)

France’s I am; my lookout’s glum.
From Paris (near Pontoise) I come,
And soon my neck, depending from
A rope, will learn the weight of my bum.

;o)

Book Reviews: Kiddie Mega-Mega Pack

“Not a bad start,” as the serpent said when he swallowed the toe of the hippopotamus.

The Tide is Coming In
A family spends a day at the beach, some relaxing and others building a sand castle. . . a big fancy one. When the tide comes in there’s crabs and seaweed to contend with, and then of course the tide itself.
The best character is the really helpful dog.
Nicely painted, but not much of a story. I can almost hear the kiddies asking, “Then what happens?”
3/5

ABC Train
As you would expect from the title, this is in standard “A is for—” format, with the first page being “automobile” and “backup,” as in traffic jam. There’s two letters for each page, and they rhyme, which works well. The story is held together by the presence of the train, which rides from one land to another, entertaining the kids on board.
Some pages go sideways, but the worst is the one with the bats, with the lettering completely upside down. I’m usually pretty good at reading that way, but it was impossible to make this one out without giving up—sigh—and turning it over.
Painted in early 90s TV cartoon style, with a lot of edges.
4/5

Animal Family Portraits
If I understand this correctly, the author picks two animals who don’t seem to have all that much in common and combines them to a make a third, completely fictional animal. It’s written out and it doesn’t seem like it’ll work, but then you turn the page and see the family portrait—wonder if they had them made at the mall—and you think, “Yeah, okay.”
An antelope is wearing scuba gear. That might be the first time that phrase has ever been written. The toucan, penguin, and puffin wear silly hats. The most obvious, and therefore the best ones, are panda and platypus.
3.5/5

Annabel on the Go
Annabel likes to pretend she’s someone different each day. Each page shows her doing something different: artist, baker, detective, doctor, etc. Her cat usually joins in on the fun.
This is likely the most rudimentary art work I’ve ever seen, short of stick figures, but it actually doesn’t hurt. The girl has a giant imagination and it’s shown perfectly here.
3.5/5

Best Beast
A girl wants to win a contest so her family can go to the beach. Unfortunately it’s for pets, of which she has none and they’re too poor to get one. So the local crazy lady gives her a rock, and things go from there.
The artwork is more like colored sketches, but the newsflash here is the giant Pinocchio noses everyone on this family sports. Not the pet or the neighbor, just them.
This was cute, except for the part where her parents gave in way too easily.
3.5/5

Her Majesty: An Illustrated Guide to the Women who Ruled the World
“You don’t necessarily need a crown (but they sure are pretty).”
Mostly matter-of-fact with a few instances of trying to be funny. They read like a basic Wikipedia entry dumbed down for kids, which is fine, considering who the target audience is. Hatshepsut goes first (although it’s spelled “Hapshepsut” here) so it seems it’s going to be in chronological order. Boudica is another fave, but then I do love redheads. Lakshmibai was the most intriguing of those I didn’t know; not sure why the inclusion of Gandhi was there, as no other entry had a man sharing the splotlight.
Interesting tidbit: It was Victoria who started the white wedding dress trend, no surprise if you think about it. But too bad Queens Christina and Wilhemina, as listed at the end, didn’t make the cut, and it’s certainly a huge surprise Cleopatra wasn’t included.
The drawings are beautiful, and not an inch is wasted. It does make the script look small, though.
3.5/5

Letters from Santa: A Christmas Alphabet Book
The title is a great pun. Learn your ABCs with Santa, telling you about traditions of Christmas while rhyming well.
Some of the verses don’t say much, too abstract, but in general should be fun for the kiddies.
The illustrations are done on postage stamp backgrounds, with some throwback style; 50s or 60s or something like that. It’s cute.
3.5/5

We’re Going to the Farm
Simple singalong of all the things you can do on the farm: ride horses, roll in the hay, play with animals, etc.
Just as simple artwork, nothing fancy for the kiddies, but It shouldn’t matter as the singing is the highlight.
3/5

Once Upon a Tree
A small story, no doubt meant to be read out loud, about a leaf who’s happy at the top of a tree until birds and caterpillars and the like make him question the true meaning of his life.
This is by far the most emotional leaf I’ve ever known, prone to fits of drama and jealousy and most of all self-doubt. He finds himself at the end, but he’s gonna be in for a big surprise when a shoe crunches him. . . and no, that’s not a spoiler.
3.5/5

Tall Tall Tree
A Northern Spotted Owl introduces the book by saying that until recently humans didn’t know what a thriving ecology could occur so high up in trees, with many different animals living or visiting.
The rhymes are inventive, following the usually more hilarious conceit of what would be the last word in one stanza starting off the next. Each verse describes a creature that lives way up there, though there’s only so much information you can include in three lines (the fourth is always “And now comes number x”). The second line has to rhyme with the next number, so no doubt that was a little difficult for the author.
I can only describe the artwork as lush, with tree bark and green leaves, bushes, and ferns dominating. The owls are a little dark, but the detail is wonderful, the banana slugs just as horrifying as in real life (try eating a chocolate banana slug, I dare you). The ladybugs, on the other hand, were cute. But you really need a vertical view to understand the size of these trees, especially when there’s drawings of tiny humans at the bottom. I first read this on my desktop, then downloaded it to my tablet; the text is better on the former, the paintings on the latter.
At the end are many facts and details about redwoods, as well as an invite to go back and look through the artwork for other animals (I’m guessing the author didn’t bother to try rhyming any numbers further than ten).
4/5

Daytime Nighttime (All Through the Year)
Rhyming stanzas, surrounded by trees and plenty of greenery, tell the reader about what certain animals do, told chronologically with one daytime and one nighttime creature each month.
With the need to rhyme there’s not much room for description, making for a flowery pose that seems designed more for being read aloud than actual learning for the young’uns.
You don’t often find weasels included in kids’ books.
At the end there’s a match game to see if the reader remembers which animals are paired in which month, followed by more facts about each animal and a page actually called “Teachable Moments.”
3.5/5

I Give You My Heart
A little boy in what appears to be rural Japan finds a store on the way to school and zeros in on a wooden box. The owner gives it to him and then promptly disappears. The kid can’t get the box open until his seventh birthday, when he wakes up to find it ajar. Anything else would be spoiling, but it has to do with cycles of life and passing the torch from one generation to the next.
The artwork is kinda hard to describe; best I can come up with is muted watercolor, vaguely impressionistic but a little more lifelike than that. Sometimes I find it beautiful, others mundane. The only problem here is the incredibly tiny text.
3.5/5

Rivers, Seas and Oceans
Starts with a photo of an island with kid drawings of birds, the sun, a boat, fish, etc. added to it. After that it looks more like a textbook, with photos, drawings, fun facts, and little quizzes.
“A penguin is very tasty to an orca.” Don’t know why that made me laugh. And they’re drawn just as cute here, though only when their wings are out. . . then penguins, no the orcas.
After the intro there’s chapters on different kinds of water, oceans, and seas. The contrast between the Carib and the Med seem almost day and night. Iguazu Falls is featured a lot. Yellowstone makes an appearance, as does the Grand Canyon, along with more famous watery places like Venice and Hawaii.
3.5/5

Santa, Please Bring Me a Gnome
A little girl knows what she wants for Christmas and is not swayed by a trip with mom to the toy store. Grandma is much more understanding; the dog might not be, though. She doesn’t get what she wants in the end, but it all works out.
Sweet story.
The artwork is what you would expect for a pre-school level: simple and broad.
4/5

That Looks Good on You
A children’s book about the history of fashion. Okay. . .
What age group is this for when they’re expected to know what avant-garde means?
The rows of hairstyles and hats remind me of picking out the perfect emoji.
Then it actually does portray clothes throughout the ages, though the attempts at context aren’t enough. (At the end there’s a timeline that offers time, place, and what the clothing is.)
Hard to see the point of it, when you could be teaching kids something more valuable.
2/5

Where Is My Coat? Jungle Animals
Animal silhouettes want you to guess what they are. . . and help them find their coats, as the title spells out.
For the most part it’s incredibly simple, so this would be good for really young kids. The artwork is playful. I really can’t think of anything else to say, as it’s so simplistic and yet just perfect the way it is.
4/5

;o)

Book Reviews: Rush, Librarians, and Sports

Banged a knuckle and yelled “Son of a–” Then saw a woman glaring at me with a kid, so I finished with, “Preacher Man.” (It pays to know music.)

On This Date
After an intriguing and thought-provoking intro, the book moves to one usually-long-forgotten historical anecdote a day, much more interesting than any one-small-page calendar. Some are more or less expected, even if the particular date wasn’t known, but the fun is in the topics that would usually have no right being in a serious history tome.
Some of my faves. . . okay, a lot of my faves:
March of Dimes (Wow!); Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer; Tokyo Rose; Lou Hoover; Edmund G Ross; Oppenheimer; Massacre on the Tuscarawas; Sherman and Johnston; Columbine; Jingle Bells; the low-altitude barrel roll in a 707; the birth of the Smiley; We Shall Overcome; Marshall wins Nobel Peace Prize; Jack Robinson and Pee Wee Reese (“someone with the guts NOT to fight back.”); Carson McCullers, Karen Blixen, and Marilyn Monroe walk into a lunch; Theodore Geisel (“He was a political cartoonist all his life, meaning he managed the difficult task of being amusing to kids and adults.”); Princess Bride (even Mark Knopfler gets a mention!); and “Surf music is just the sound of the waves being played on a guitar.”
Did not expect the author of a non-fiction history book to go meta, but in one entry he writes about Philadelphians booing their cricket team as a reason the capital was moved to DC. . . then, “Well, no, I was just seeing if you were paying attention.”
4/5

Rush: Album by Album
The title tells you everything you need to know: a bunch of Rush fans got together to shoot the breeze about each of the many studio albums. . . except these guys are either incredibly familiar with the band from working with them, or are musicians—some in tribute bands—music journalists, or similar.
Intriguing forward by the author, but then I’d expect no less when it comes to my favorite band. Oddly, the book isn’t all that long, even with tons of photos, from album covers to concert fliers to pages from comic books! (As graphic novels were called back then, kiddies.)
Not a fan of Dream Theater, but Mike Portnoy seems like a fun guy to hang out with: “The way most kids my age were staring at a Playboy centerfold, I was looking at a Modern Drummer centerfold and salivating over the whole kit.”
The one downside for me was a lot of musical verbiage that went way beyond my understanding, especially about drumming. Was also surprised by how short the Moving Pictures section was, considering everyone calls it the band’s seminal album. As I’m sure every reader/fan will think, they spend too little time talking about my favorites and too much on those songs I hardly ever listen to, if at all. Still, there are nice things said about The Pass and Bravado—yes, among my faves—especially Geddy claiming the latter is his fave to play live. There’s also a great feeling when someone says something I’d already thought of, such as the addendum in Ghost of A Chance. Most of all, the agreement of The Wreckers being such a beautiful song made me smile.
The last 15 pages or so list the contributors, offer a bibliography, and end with a pretty thorough index.
3.5/5

This Is What a Librarian Looks Like
Subtitled: A Celebration of Libraries, Communities, and Access to Information
When I started this I thought it would be quick and easy; boy, was I wrong. The format is a photo of a librarian followed by a short quote, with some longer articles to break up what eventually becomes monotony, though once in a while a cute line appears, like “ultimate search ninjas.” For those who have a stereotypical view of what librarians do—or look like—this will change that completely. Very few of the women shown here, for example, wear glasses, and even though I’ve only seen one with a pierced nose in person, there’s plenty of oddly-painted hair and such in here.
But it’s the longer stories that are the highlights. The doll-lending program has to be the cutest thing ever. Amy Dickinson and Cory Doctorow chime in with great articles, but if I had to pick a best, it would be the Montana Bookmobile.
There’s also a fascinating intro, in which the author says: “What made the library of Alexandria great wasn’t just the collection of books, but rather its intellectual raison d’être: the insatiable pursuit, creation, and dissemination of knowledge as a force to drive civilization.” Nothing more to say after that. . .
4/5

Battle of Arnhem
In what might be too short to even be called a novella, a veteran of the battle recounts his experience, filled with death, destruction, stupidity, and black humor. There’s tons of tiny details, some of them incredibly interesting.
“It was explained that, when we arrived, we would most likely be disappointed as all the fun would be over.” Wonder how often soldiers have heard that.
For such a short story, there’s a ton of detail. There’s also more to it than just the battle, as after his capture the author was taken to Dresden, along with 500 other prisoners, and was there for the famous firebombing.
But more than anything it gives you the grit and emotion of being that close to an enemy who’s trying to kill you just as bad as you’re trying to kill them. This is exceedingly rare in modern warfare; even as a former Marine I find it hard to imagine what these soldiers went through.
But some things never change, like the incompetence of staff officers, whom he disses over and over.
3.5/5

Women In Sports: 50 Fearless Athletes Who Played to Win
Though it clocks in at 128 pages, it felt a lot longer. Formatted in tiny chapters, each section of prose is accompanied by a cartoonish painting with hard-to-read words in tiny script floating around the outsides. It mostly just states facts in a boring manner; every chapter starts with “she was born on” and then “she started to play.” They are good intros to each person, but the lack of style is such that I doubt it would inspire anyone to find out more. I realize this is for kids, but it underestimates the intelligence of its young readers.
The only chapter that I found remotely interesting—not that the women weren’t interesting, it’s the presentation that lacks—was about the final game of the 1999 Women’s World Cup, where over 90,000 spectators packed the Rose Bowl to watch the United States beat China in penalties. Why did I find this interesting? Because I was there.
3/5

;o)

Poetry Tuesday: In The Microscope

By Czech scientist/poet Miroslav Holub, 1923-1998.

Here too are the dreaming landscapes,
lunar, derelict.
Here too are the masses,
tillers of the soil.
And cells, fighters
who lay down their lives
for a song.

Here too are cemeteries,
fame and snow.
And I hear the murmuring,
the revolt of immense estates.

;o)