Book Reviews: 22 Reasons Kids Love This Blog

Storytime: Astromouse
A baby mouse totally buys it when told the moon is made of cheese, and instantly decides he wants to go there. He doesn’t think it through. In the end he figures things are just fine the way they are.
It’s a pretty cute story, amusingly told. Not the twists one would expect at the end, even though the ending itself was never in question. The artwork and syntax make this a good bet for pre-kinders.
4/5

Georgia O’Keeffe
A quick colorful biography of the famous painter, meant for kids.
Broad lively artwork from the very start, where while one boy chases chickens another is being chased by a girl with a wooden sword. Unfortunately this is not Georgia; she’s over on the side playing with a snail. One panel has her and a flower on the sidewalk as the only color in a bleak scene, showing she was more into studying her surroundings than those around her. Moving to New Mexico seemed to do the trick, unlocking all her powers of observation and her ability to translate it with a brush.
Since I learned about her through Steigletz, I was glad to see him included here. And for those worried about it, the paintings she’s most famous for are not included here; it is a kid’s book, after all.
At the end are photographs of her with almost the same text as shown before, without the artwork.
4/5

Harriet Tubman
A quick colorful biography of the fearless anti-slavery heroine, meant for kids.
Some will be confused as to who is being talked about in the beginning; it isn’t till later that it’s said that she changed her name to Harriet. All of the things she’s famous for are here, along with a few facts I didn’t know about but only serve to elevate her already heroic status. It’s easy to imagine kids who’re oversaturated with today’s superheroes being swept up by her story.
At the end the text is repeated without the artwork, just elevated a bit for the adults.
4/5

If All the World
A little girl spends a year—though that’s probably a metaphor—with her grandpa, whom she clearly adores. She even wishes she could replant all his birthdays so he never grows old. But how does she cope when he’s no longer there?
Her answer probably doesn’t help with the pain, but becomes a fitting tribute, and is likely a good idea for those who have recently gone through it.
The artwork has a sketchy—as in being colored sketches, not unclear or hinky—quality to them that help the story along.
4/5

Power to the Princess
According to the blurb, these are fairy tales retold for the #metoo generation, mostly text with some cute humans colorfully drawn in the margins, plus an occasional full-page artwork.
Best line, the one that best describes what this book is about: “And that is how Belle became a princess. But not that kind of princess.”
In case you were wondering if this is written in old-style English, one of the fairies likes to say, “Well, that was awkward.” Another story contains the line, “But he was a vegetarian, so that made it weird.” Possibly my fave comes from Snow White: Her hair, pitch black, was now white as snow. “Huh, that’s a new one,” Neve said in wonder.
There are labor unions, sleep clinics, fitness centers, and a detective who’s assigned to cold curse cases. Sleeping Beauty becomes an expert in the field of narcolepsy. No one needs to tell this guy not to date a damsel in permanent distress. And someone could make a fortune teaching the woodland-creature hair-braiding class.
But it’s not all unicorns and rainbows (BTW, there isn’t one unicorn or rainbow in the entire book). Some of the modern-day counterpart jobs were farfetched; somehow Belle becomes an undercover cop! It’s great that the princesses in the Little Mermaid got married, but there was no hint of them being anything more than friends before that.
The artwork is pretty much as you’d expect it. Snow White is a little jarring at first, with the overalls and white hair. Her stepmother, on the other hand, is just my style, even with the Medusa head.
3.5/5

Gina From Siberia
Unlike the husky that shows up every once in a while, Gina doggie doesn’t look like a snow dog, but living in Siberia gives you no other choice. Somehow she loves it, and doesn’t want to go when the family moves.
There’s a whole page of things she saw on the trip, some of them funny.
Dogs aren’t allowed on the train, but rather than put her in the basket, mom dresses her up as an ugly baby. Not smart. (The bio says this actually happened, so I can nitpick.) And dogs are allowed on the plane. Huh.
Knowing this is a period piece does not make seeing the hammer and sickle on the flags any less strange.
Gina does not like heat sources, considering she thinks radiators and vents are monsters. But for everyone except me, pizza makes everything better. And just like that Gina isn’t homesick anymore.
Incredibly simplistic artwork, considering it’s such a big story.
3.5/5

The Truth About Dinosaurs
A modern-day chicken tries to prove it’s actually a dinosaur, and in the process gives a lesson on actual dinos. It’s all done through the similarity of feet and a photo album, but don’t worry about there not being cameras to shoot the dinosaurs back then; after all, this story’s told by a talking chicken.
Dinosaur eggs look like gemstones.
This one got me with a line in the blurb: “For curious people from 4 up to 250 million years old.”
Silly, but educational.
3.5/5

Watermelon Madness
Noura loves watermelon so much she won’t eat anything else. (Even I have something other than bacon and ice cream once in a while!) She throws a tantrum when her mother feeds her something else, then goes downstairs in the middle of the night and scores a giant watermelon, taking it int her room and hiding it under her bed for munching in the morning. Then weird stuff happens.
If you want a kid to do something, I suppose there are worse ways of letting them know the penalty for disobeying. Could also serve as a lesson for parents to be more tolerant.
3.5/5

Little Tails Under the Sea
Other than the fact they’re in a sub instead of a plane, the format holds as the two little guys explore the world they find themselves in. The last one with the dinosaurs got a bit silly, so it’s good to see them back to something more realistic. . . if I can actually say that about talking animals.
As expected, they jaunt underwater, mostly staying away from other animals while describing them, giving the educational content this series always provides. And as always there’s some friendly critter that helps them out of the mess they made, though in this situation I would not have expected a polar bear.
I can just imagine the orca’s rage to be described as a big sea panda.
At the end there’s more info about each animal.
This was at least as good as the dinosaur one, though I liked the previous ones better. Nothing wrong with this one, though.
3.5/5

Diary of a Witch
Told in rhyme, this is a witch telling her story to her diary.
The wallpaper front page has a few sketches of scenes, such as broom, hat, cauldron, cat, but there’s also a hilarious shot of a jousting knight after a running spellcaster. See what happens when you forget your broom?
This redheaded witch has a heroic honker.
There’s an early shot of her reading about 80s glamour while complaining about her frizzy hair. Then she ditches the robe for heels and a leather miniskirt. . . kinda disturbing. The fact she’s in a fast car with a younger man might indicate her version of a midlife crisis.
So, basically she’s reexamining her life, trying to decide if being bad is a bad idea.
It’s cute, and not at all scary, but then I doubt it was meant to be.
3.5/5

Giant: A Panda of the Enchanted Forest
A giant panda sits in a tree, trying to stop eating and start sleeping, while other animals take in the scene. He only talks to the tree, though he’s surprised when it talks back. When an emergency strikes the forest, the two have to team up to save the day.
Pretty simple story, so it should appeal to the smaller kids, as long as they don’t get frightened. I didn’t find it particularly interesting, but then I’m not the demographic this book is going for.
3/5

Luke and Lottie. It’s Halloween!
A small brother/sister duo prepare for their first Halloween, which doesn’t bode well because they’re easily scared of the decorations.
There must not be a lot of streetlights in this neighborhood, considering the big lanterns they carry. And because they’re holding hands with Dad, they’re not gonna be able to carry their bags full of candy.
There’s one shot I love where Dad’s dressed up as a vampire and pretending to be scared of the ghost and the witch, and in the background Mom is giggling.
I learned banana ghosts desserts looks pretty cool, though not exactly mouthwatering.
Basically Halloween described to kids who’ve never seen it, or are scared of their first one. Pretty straightforward with some cute moments.
3.5/5

If a Dog Could Wear a Hat
A little pigtailed redhead is home in bed, apparently sick, if the thermometer and her sad face are clues. Looking for something to pass the time, she dreams in rhyming couplets of her dog doing various occupations, based on the hat the canine wears.
As you would expect, it’s too cute for words. Though relatively simple, the art shows exactly what it needs to and nothing more. Erin’s smile is so infectious, which is perfectly shown on a page near the end where she’s sitting on the floor surrounded by hats.
Ends with a twist!
4/5

My Favorite Pet: Hamsters
An early primer on what’s probably the world’s cutest rodent, with facts told in photos with captions.
The first quiz was a little too simple, even for a three-year-old.
Hamster balls are to hamster wheels what yoga balls are to exercise bikes.
There’s a glossary at the end which shows just how young the audience for this book is, but it’s fun enough, and there might be facts even adults don’t know.
4/5

Swim Little Fish
A small red fish does un-fish things like jumping out of the water and getting a tan before returning to its home in a seashell, getting into bed and looking out the window at the sea full of stars.
Big bright drawings show this book is meant for the littlest of kids than can understand what they’re seeing. It’s cute enough, though if you get kids too old for this they’ll ask why fish are doing human things.
3.5/5

Annabel and Cat / Annabel y Gato
The simplest of drawings help tell the story of. . . well, look at the title. On the opposite page is a description in both English and Spanish. The Cat is right there with Annabel as far as activities go, from putting on plays to arts and crafts, from making snowmen to eating pancakes to going to the library. Other than the wall shadows and the safari, there isn’t anything here that would have been different had Annabel been on her own, but then it wouldn’t be as cute.
3.5/5

Discover Military Equipment
As always in this series, rather than drawings, it’s photographs with captions.
Starts off with throwing knives, which I’m sure every kid will now want. In general, it’s a bit strange to be teaching kids about all the different ways someone can be killed.
More than once a chapter started with “____ changed warfare,” enough times for me to think it was purposeful, though it did make it boring.
3/5

My Favorite Machine: Fire Trucks
As always, this series has photos instead of drawings, which I think makes it better (ignore the part where I’m a photographer).
Lots of beauty shots in red; just about the only blue was a light. The most interesting photos were the ones showing the equipment stored in every nook and cranny.
There’s some really simple tests, with the answers in the back, alongside a glossary with incredibly basic definitions, which show this book is meant for very young children.
3.5/5

Snowy: A Leopard of the High Mountains
A family of snow leopards runs away when they hear human hunters, but the youngster is separated and feeling lonesome. A marmot drops from a tree, yet is not afraid of being used as lunch. Instead they snuggle and keep each other warm, then set off with the help of other animals to get the kid feline home.
As a lesson in teamwork and helping others, it’s fine. I just don’t find it very believable—and that’s after granting animals can talk—that such cooperation could exist amongst ALL animals, especially between predator and prey.
3/5

The Flying Rock
Kid getting picked on loses it and throws a rock at the bullies, only to find he’s got more of a pitcher’s arm than he suspected, plonking one of them on the head. He runs home to tell his grandpa what he did, and gramps sits him down for a lecture and a story. That story is about how you never know if luck is good or bad until the full circumstances play out, which I had heard before as an ancient Chinese parable.
The moral of the story the grandfather gave didn’t seem to fit, but the end of the framing section did bring it together. Won’t spoiler it, but let’s just say the medical stuff might be too much for small kids to handle. Other than that, it was a good story well told.
3.5/5

Just the Right Size
A quick tour through the animal kingdom, differentiating by size. Example: “A ladybug can land on a tree branch, a giraffe cannot. But a giraffe can do something else that’s great.” You get the gist, the point being that every animal is good at something no matter what the size.
Ends with a lesson and an interracial family hug, which is nice but a little highhanded, and probably not going to be understood by kids small enough to read this.
3.5/5

10 Reasons to Love … a Lion
As the title says, this book is all about why you should think lions are cool, though that also depends on your point of view. Saying that unlike other cats they enjoy hanging out together is one thing, but it takes a totally different meaning when you’re running for your life.
Each page features a beautiful drawing, filled with color and staring lions, as well as text and captions on other animals, as well as plants.
My favorite fact was that porcupines got the lions’ number!
Pangolins sure have gotten famous recently.
Nice to look at, some fun facts. Sure to be a hit with kids.
4/5

;o)

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