Book Reviews: Kids Are

The Boy and the Egg
In what looks like a European town, a boy finds an egg and takes it home, wondering what will come out of it. It ends up being nothing he could have imagined.
Cute story, with a good twist. Nicely drawn, though nothing here really stands out.
3/5

Cody Eats Everything
Cody’s a dog that’ll eat everything, including rocks. And poop.
This isn’t really a story, just a list of what this crazy dog will eat. Might have been shorter to list what he doesn’t, if anything. This is for really little ones to learn to read, with easy words and plenty of repetition. Simply drawn as well.
3/5

Happy Easter Little Hoo
The little owl is looking for Easter eggs. There’s plenty to find, most of them easy, so play along.
This is more like a hidden thing game book than a story. Nice for what it is.
3/5

Kat Makes
Kat makes food, architecture, art, slime, and a lot of other things. As you might imagine, she’s not the cleanest kid ever.
Like others in this series, it’s not an actual story, just a list of the things Kat makes. Of course there’s a lot of repetition. Once you’re okay with the fact that this book is designed to teach really little ones to read, then it can be enjoyed for what it’s worth.
3/5

Little Hoo Has the Flu
Disclaimer: I had a cold when I read this, but not the flu.
As the title screams, the little owl is sick. His mom takes care of him. His friends come over to play, find out they can’t, and return later with gifts and get-well cards. Hoo feels better.
The first shot shows Hoo sick in bed, but smiling. . . no. Has this author never had the flu? Maybe this is done to make little readers feel better when they’re sick, but it seems dishonest.
Funny how he has a huge red spot in the middle of his face, like a runny nose, but there’s no nose to be seen.
At the end you can make and print out your own get-well card.
3/5

Mole Goes to the Beach
Amidst large drawings and a smiling sun, Mole does all kinds of beach-related activities.
There’s no actual story here, just a list of things the animal in question likes to do when near the ocean.
I wonder if it ever crossed the author’s mind that a mole, unlike a dog or cat, would be an unfamiliar animal to the tykes reading this. “Mommy, what’s a mole?” There’s nothing explaining what an actual mole is like, because most of them don’t go to the beach.
3/5

Monsters Move
Monsters do a lot of things, usually in rhyme, including mixing and grooving and making noise. And let’s not forget feather tickling and farting.
Like others in this series, it’s not an actual story, just a list of the ways in which monsters move. Of course there’s a lot of repetition. Once you’re okay with the fact that this book is designed to teach really little ones to read, then it can be enjoyed for what it’s worth.
3/5

My Favorite Pet: Mice
Photos of the animal in question fill this book, with a little bit of text to go along. They sleep, eat, and clean themselves a lot. Their environment, food preferences, and the like are all shown.
Both the reading and the quizzes are appropriately easy for the target age level. In fact, the quizzes might be too easy.
3.5/5

My Favorite Sport: Tennis
Photos backed with a little text explain all the rules and nuances of the game to kids.
Some of the captions are simple enough, while others go into more detail, like teaching how to serve. There are some quizzes that aren’t that hard, as long as the reader is paying attention. There’s one caption that uses the word “practice” four times, which makes it difficult to read.
There is one error: when explaining “deuce,” it says the next player to win two points in a row wins the game, but that’s not necessarily true.
There’s one shot at the end of a smiling kid who looks about the same size as the racket he’s holding. It’s really cute.
3.5/5

BigFoot Goes on Big City Adventures
Find out about 10 cities around the world—don’t know how Mayapan in Mexico made the cut—and then search for the elusive BigFoot in the same way you would for Waldo.
Biggie is incredibly difficult to find, but at least he’s always in his famous pose, which helps a little. It’s also good that he’s always in context, unlike the koalas on top of the Sydney Opera House. What doesn’t help is the art style, which is watercolory/Impressionistic, sometimes not sharp enough for details. The rampant unicorns were easier to find, as were just about every other thing except the footprints. Some of the objects were a little silly, though, like the presidential pens. I eventually had to zoom in quite a bit to find him. For those with the physical version, hope you’ve got glasses or a magnifier, but now that you know what you’re getting into, it’s nothing but fun.
Some of the factoids explain what are simple concepts, so this book seems to be targeted for kids, even if it claims all ages.
4/5

My Daddy and Me
A small cute list of things kids like to do with the masculine parental unit, with different animals playing the parts, shown in big cartoony art. Designed for beginning readers, it’s meant to get the child thinking about their own experiences with Daddy. It’s sweet.
Somehow it seems very wrong to see alligators wearing clothes. . .
The “buy me” page at the end mentions something about how the pages can be folded to reveal new images, like the old MAD magazines, but it obviously doesn’t work on digital.
3.5/5

My Mommy and Me
As expected, this follows the exact same format as the Daddy edition, a list of things certain animal kids like to do with the feminine parental unit, shown in big cartoony art.
Designed for beginning readers, it’s meant to get the child thinking about their own experiences with Mommy. It’s sweet.
Tigers love new shoes.
The “buy me” page at the end mentions something about how the pages can be folded to reveal new images, like the old MAD magazines, but it obviously doesn’t work on digital.
3.5/5

What a Nice Car!
A mouse supposedly “finds” a car and takes off in it to find the owner. Along the way he meets up with a zoo’s worth of different animals, all of whom join him in this supposedly honorable quest.
There’s no mention that the best place to find a car’s owner is right where the car was found. The owner’s probably wondering what happened to it as they drive it further and further away.
The text is the same for every page, which no doubt works for a kid learning to read but will likely bore everyone else. Surprisingly, everyone lives happily ever after, watching the sunset.
The artwork looks a lot more minimal than most.
2.5/5

AYA and PAPAYA Find Happiness
It takes about half the book and a look in the mirror for Aya to realize what’s wrong with her. It seems rather obvious, though, and doesn’t explain why. She and her dolly go looking for happiness in some strange places.
Sneaky little message of empowerment.
The artwork is almost 3-D, with some of the characters drawn like those in Song of the Sea, especially the mom. There’s a cute shot of the dynamic duo upside-down while looking under the bed.
3.5/5

;o)

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