Book Reviews: The Most Erotic Organ Is the Mind

My brain is a gold mind.

The Red
The owner of a failing art gallery in Noo Yawk gets an offer she can’t refuse. . . or really doesn’t want to refuse. She’d promised her mom she’d do anything to keep the gallery open, and now anything and everything is what she has to do. Two-thirds of the way through something happens that makes her back out of the deal, something bad enough that she thinks it’s worth losing the gallery over, but in the end she perseveres.
Despite trying to make it “just business,” she actually grows quite a bit through the story, and not just sexually. Malcolm unintentionally taught her how to be manipulative. . . not that Seb didn’t deserve it. But the whole point of the story, besides the sex, is that in the end it made her stronger.
I love the nymphs! Best and funniest scene ever. Too bad there wasn’t more of them.
So yes, I enjoyed most of this. The ultimate reveal was easy to guess with all the clues strewn around, but by then it didn’t really matter. Not a fan of the ending, though; that’s one guy who didn’t deserve to be rewarded.
4/5

Her Alien Masters
After her spaceship crashes onto an alien world and kills people, Mira gets sentenced to basically being the slave of a family who lost loved ones in the crash; that includes sex.
This is the third entry in a series, and I haven’t read the previous, but I am familiar with this author’s other works, and like them. She brings the same delicious humor here, especially in the small moments: a little joke here, noticing the look in someone’s eyes, that kind of thing. This one was different because there are kids—alien kids, but still—involved, so it made for a strange dynamic compared to others from this author and genre. I might have enjoyed it more because of that, though I’m not sure; it was simply refreshing to have something different, especially since it allowed the main character to be more than just a sex slave. Similarly, most romances have a next-to-last twist featuring a misunderstanding that needs to be overcome, but it’s refreshing to see errors occur here naturally, due to different cultures, rather than the usual manufactured drama.
4/5

Misadventures of a City Girl
LA divorcee goes to hippie spa but spends all her time in a hunky mountain man’s bed. Hilarity and misunderstandings ensue.
The first note I had was on the fact she booked a four-week stay at a spa. Really? People do that? I’d be bored out of my head in less than a week. Just me? Fine.
My next note was that only a third of the way through and they’re already past their worst issues. Didn’t think the rest of the book would only feature sex. . . then I wondered if her ex would show up. . . and I was right on both counts.
Then there’s the point where I wrote “Wow, this is where a girl should realize he’s too damaged to be with and look out for herself, especially since she has her own problems.” To have her go back to him after that was completely unrealistic, but I suppose it wouldn’t be an “against all odds” romance if she didn’t.
Despite some idiotic moves from both, this is an excellently written book. I always judge by how much I like the protagonist, and except for some strange decisions apparently made to move the plot along early on, I love her. That did cost a potential higher grade, as did the note I wrote higher. This could have earned a 5/5. I’m just glad there wasn’t any need to overplay the angry ex thing.
4/5

Passionate Desire
Woman who’s been hurt before tries not to fall in love with guy at work, even though her lust for him is so great she lets him do her while stuck in an elevator.
I can’t think of much to say here, and that’s a problem. I’ve read other books where the protagonist is damaged, but this one goes a lot further psychologically in her reactions; I’m not saying it’s not realistic, as I’m sure that kind of thing happens, but the fact she’s otherwise an intelligent individual makes it harder to take. The ex/stalker storyline feels tacked on, but then without it there’d be no story, no motivation. . . no reason for him to have to overcome her damage in order to win her. It is indeed thin on plot, and the characters are okay, if bland. Just feels like there’s nothing special; even the sex scenes were unmemorable.
3/5

;o)

Book Reviews: Erotic Carpenters, Pilots, and Students

Again, rather than post something witty that happened to me today—usually at my expense—for the erotic reviews I invite you to search out photos of Black Widow from the Captain America Winter Soldier movie. . . but then you might never come back, so read this first.

Not Safe for Work
A corporate woman shows her new boss around the office on a weekend, and they end up having sex there. Turns out big boss, the cold humorless type, has cameras installed and saw the whole thing, firing her. . . but not him. Hmmm. Turns out there was an ulterior motive, but in which direction is he jealous?
This is a novella, short enough that I didn’t have time to make notes, write down impressions as I went along. On the other hand, it was short enough to remember. The one thing that really annoyed me was that she hated the big boss for firing her, yet oh so willingly let him have her, even if her lover was part of it. By the end she was claiming to love him. That didn’t strike me as anywhere near true; this would have been simpler if she’d done it just for the sex, or even to please her boyfriend. This three-way relationship was just too dysfunctional to bear.
2/5

Blackmail
Yale student misses class because she was asleep in a common room. She hears her TA coming and hides in the closet. Then she watches him having sex with a guy she can’t stand. Assuming it’s rape, she records it, gets caught, and is forced to participate and also be taped so everyone can have blackmail material on each other.
I thought I’d become used to having multiple points of view, but in this case it was a bit confusing. Perhaps it’s due to Julian and Tristan’s names being too similar. As for the writing, there’s a really long philosophical discussion that made me want to tear my eyes out, while also making me glad I didn’t actually major in philosophy despite getting easy A’s in the two electives. I’d rather read about Mia playing the piano again.
On to the characters. I wish Tristan hadn’t been pushed so far into jerkass territory than I found him unredeemable. Mostly he’s, to use Mia’s words, “spoiled and self-important because his parents are ridiculously wealthy; used to getting his way because, although I am loath to admit it, he is unnaturally gorgeous; and predisposed to treating people like a means to an end.” Julian seems to be weak-willed and will go along with whatever they tell him, which is unusual as he’s the oldest. He was meh at best. Mia seemed cool at times—liked her but didn’t love her—at least when sex isn’t getting the best of her. I certainly didn’t like her basically giving Julian a free pass for all the crap he put her through. She had the potential to be a smart character, but too often her mind failed her; annoying.
The ending just seemed weird to me, both what happened with his illness and the keys; might have been more dramatic in the sequels had she declined and Julian was forced to ostracize her in public while still wanting her. Even the sex scenes left something to be desired.
2/5

Cockpit
A female airline pilot approaching her sixties comes across her old high school boyfriend sitting in first class on her flight to London. She eventually meets him for a drink in their hotel, not expecting anything to happen because he’s wearing a wedding ring, as well as their ages. Boy, was she wrong.
Interesting that, after quite a few mentions of age at the beginning—mostly with her wondering if she could be sexy enough—it was never mentioned again, certainly not during sex. Though her self-doubt was understandable, there seemed to be too much of it, especially in her rivalry with a flight attendant half her age who’d screwed her now ex-husband. A little more of London would have been nice too.
In the end it was cute but no big deal. Extra points for having an older couple, especially the sex scenes in offbeat titillating places like the London Eye and the flight simulator. But other than that it seemed pretty standard.
3/5

Drilled
Beautiful construction worker goes in to work on a weekend, expecting to be alone—“No one had listened when she’d pointed out the problems at the time and now they were at the wire. They didn’t listen because she was a woman”—only to find herself being ogled by two rich businessmen. Erotica ensues.
For once the cover actually fits the story!
Danni loves doing construction, and it gives her a connection to her late father. She’s got a greedy, though in the end understanding, matronly mom and a horrible stepdad. I don’t remember her having any girlfriends, though I might be forgetting. Still, she seems more well-adjusted than most of the heroines in this genre, so I kinda loved this character. The two rich guys weren’t total jerks, for once, though of course there’s the inevitable miscommunication near the end that has to happen before the happy ending.
For the most part I enjoyed this. Not happy with them throwing their money at the stepfather, especially after what he said to her on the phone; he didn’t deserve it, especially considering he never apologized. Other than that, there was a lot of fun dialogue between the three when not having sex, and included some quickly-inserted fun characters–when they dressed her up and took her to lunch, for example–that, had their story been longer, would have been fun to get to know. But perhaps they’ll have their own stories later. . .
4/5

;o)

Book Reviews: Erotic Motorcycles, Teachers, and Time Travel

I feel like instead of the usual funny line or snippet of conversation, I should post a nude photo or some such when it’s a review of erotica. . .
Nah. There is a photo I can recommend, of Katherine Heigl in a black leather catsuit, out there in the vasty internet, if that helps.

His Human Rebel
Fourth in a well-written series of male alien master/female human slave stories, this one features a more common soldier rather than aristocracy, as well as the most delightful lead character so far.
Unlike the previous reasons for buying up humans, this time a whole bunch are brought in from a jail to help the war effort. And in fact Cambry does learn to fly, but once Lundric has her in his sights that becomes secondary. . . though she does have a hidden agenda of her own.
There’s a formula to these dominance erotica stories, so I don’t worry about the plot too much. The guys almost always act like entitled Neanderthals, so it’s the female protagonist that will make or break a book. There’s some similarities in them as well, as they start out feisty and learn to love, or at least obey. But the women are sufficiently different to make them unique and entertaining.
In this case Cambry’s pretty awesome, my fave of all the ladies in this series, and that’s saying a lot. Too bad her trust issues keep her from being honest with him—not that he’s earned it, but still—but that’s the way of most romance novels, even the sci-fi erotic ones. Lundric’s even more Neanderthal than most, especially at the beginning, but if she taught him to treat people better then I guess her “sacrifice” was worth it.
4/5

Stay After Class
College senior virgin desperately wants her cork popped before her next birthday, because a psychic told her to. She’s got her sights set on her art professor doing the honors, but the last thing she expected was for him to take her on a long frustrating journey to that point.
I’m not sure how I feel about this. On the one hand it’s a well-told romance, but on the other. . . I can’t imagine her being that patient with someone who, as much as he wanted to do right by her, was manipulating her the entire way. He certainly wouldn’t have done that with an older woman, or one not as innocent. Despite his claims, it felt like this whole long timeline was more about him; she could have been more open about what her deadline and the dating app meant, but he treated her like a child far too much, and his excuse of “protecting” her was the ultimate in condescension.
As for the characters, Amanda was a lot of fun, as was her BFF. Even their emoji use was on point; the cherry with the fireworks was particularly hilarious, as well as the band-aid. As for him, he seems to be a genuinely nice guy who simply has no idea how to treat a modern woman; he seems to be stuck in some sort of weird age of chivalry, mixed with some Neanderthal “She’s mine” crap. Every other character seemed to be differing shades of evil.
I will admit the author almost got me by including a musical piece by one of my fave musicians, Jesse Cook, but I’m pretty sure I didn’t give any extra credit for that.
3/5

Slave to the MC
In the second book of a series—I did not read the first—a smart sassy part-time stripper deals with trying to pay off her mother’s debts while being the sexual plaything of an entire motorcycle gang, including the wives.
This story is unusual: it’s one thing for a submissive to be such with one master, but to be a more than willing slave to a gang, not just in sex but having her entire life controlled. . . that’s not seen often. The good thing is that, even as she fights it, she realizes she enjoys this kind of thing, which makes it a lot easier to take. She’s surprisingly introspective, and pretty damn smart, at least in her thoughts if not in her life choices.
Wasn’t particularly a fan of the story, since I hate all the gangster stuff, but some of her thoughts were intriguing, and if she’s willing—as she always is—the sex scenes are pretty hot in a primal way.
3.5/5

30th Century: Escape
A military woman from long in the future sends troops back to the 27th to fix history so humans don’t get genocided, but instead of heading the mission she slips off to the 21st to start a new life.
This story had a lot of potential, but the writing was surprisingly stilted for someone who’s published so much. On the other hand, this might be his first work of fiction, and if so the inexperience shows. The conversations feel wooden and the descriptions lack style; oddly enough, that happened more and more toward the end. Having read other sci-fi erotica recently, this simply pales in comparison. In fact, it’s odd that it is listed under erotica, as there aren’t any sex scenes until the last half, and even then it’s lackluster, pedestrian. One of the main reasons is the use of the word penis. . . exclusively; apparently the author lives in an ivory tower or cave where he’s never heard of another word for the male organ.
It’s not just the sex scenes, though; there’s not a lot of emotion in the writing, period. She cried, she felt sad, that’s it; no elaboration. By contrast, the science stuff goes on for pages. Her dissertation defense lasted far too long, making me think this was the whole point of the book, with the rest just framing. And most of the science was far over my head even when she was asked to explain it in layman’s terms. Annoying.
Some of the writing is just ridiculous. “You are the mother of the children. . .” Did you really think she didn’t know that, Jen? Another example: “Jennifer gritted her teeth, hoping she was not talking over his head. If she was, would his attraction to her die?” Seriously? What a modern 21st century woman, let alone 30th. More to the point, in the few scenes we get of the 30th century—as well as the 27th—they show worlds that don’t seem all that different from today, especially socially as compared to technologically. That makes no sense; not much thought was put into that. Another problem was all the characters I had to keep track of, particularly the women, as some of them had similar names.
I wanted very much to like this, which might account for some of the disappointment. I enjoyed the premise, all the way up to her being alone on the island. Once she was rescued it went downhill. Jennifer is for the most part a likeable lead character, though there were times when she was simply too good to be true. The anthropology and archaeology of the Pacific Islands was interesting, as it fit into my own hobbies, but in the end it didn’t lead anywhere, so I suspect it was just the author’s pet.
And it was so sad that we never saw the dolphin again. . .
2/5

;o)

Book Reviews: Erotic Paris, NY, Hawaii, Elsewhere

“Come straight home after school! No stopping for ice cream or tramp stamps!”
“Space already taken,” she smiled sweetly on her way out.

A New York Minute
A TV personality whose dream of having her own talk show came true finds it gone when a big corp buys up the network and cancels the show. Her wallet and ego force her to accept a contract with the new owners, not knowing she’ll get a job she hated earlier in her career—at least it’s in Hawaii—and be put in the proximity of a guy she can’t stand/wants to have sex with.
Yes, it’s one of those plots where the two characters—arrogant guy, arrogant girl—hate each other but can’t deny the sexual attraction, and angry sex somehow becomes love. Even though I could see why she was so mad, it got tiring after a while. Of course what happened between them might not have if there wasn’t someone way worse to make her look so good in comparison, and it’s not like he’s a prize either, at least till the obligatory redemption. The positive note I have for her is that, even though she had every right to hate Bridgette, she earned my respect when she admits the girl actually does pretty well in front of the camera.
For having a plot I can’t stand, I actually enjoyed the writing quite a bit. I didn’t expect to like these characters considering how they started, and they’re still not amongst my faves, but their witty banter grew on me.
3/5

The Handy Men
A woman defies her idiot parents by buying a small hotel by the seashore, and is in lust for the two handymen even though she knows they’re a couple. The guys want her too, but it’s never that easy, is it? Especially when three’s a crowded bed.
What always saves these silly premises is the banter, which is witty here. Loved the female main character, and thankfully the guys weren’t jerks. The parents and ex-husband were sick one-dimensional villains, but Barbie was a pleasant surprise, though I have no idea why she’s marrying the ex; he’s not that rich.
There is one plot point that annoyed me. Toward the end she’s in need of $60,000. She tries to scratch it together, and so do the guys, and there isn’t one single thought of combining. Communication, people!
But there is one part that I so thoroughly loved it inspired me to raise the score half a point. Here’s the passage:
“It’s from Jerry Maguire.”
“The‘show me the money’ movie?”
“You’re hopeless with the classics,” Dean said.
“No. The classics are movies that happened before we were born. Casablanca and Somewhere in Time.”
Dean shook his head. “Bogart didn’t get the girl, and Christopher Reeves slowly withered away and died.”
“Because of love.” Jack sighed in contentment. “Isn’t that romantic?”
“You have issues.”
“Love hurts.”
Other than it being Reeve instead of Reeves, spot on. Can’t believe my two fave movies are the example!
3.5/5

26 Hours in Paris
(I had to restart this about halfway through because a power outage screwed up the kindle and I lost all my notes; hopefully my annoyance of that doesn’t come through.)
Reporter plots a trip to Paris to write about finding love, only to have her friend/boss tell her “one true love” from the past that she’s on her way. So things do not go as she expected.
It takes one hug from this guy and all her plans evaporate; wonder what it’s like having so much power over women. Though his inner thoughts about not taking no for an answer. . . there’s a fine line between determined and psychopath, especially when they’re rich.
Having read this author’s Greece story before this one, I can say I didn’t like Kat anywhere near as much as Bethany, and Marko is a far cry from Paul and Justin. The story of his cousin is nice, but not enough to overcome how I felt about him. In the other story Paul and Justin could be jerks at times, but Marko takes that far beyond. I can honestly say I hate him. I’ve been having to deal with guys like this all my life, who screwed up women’s lives and expectations until they assumed every guy was like that.
The writing is just as excellent as the other story, though. Their banter, when he’s not being a pompous ass, is close to scintillating. There’s a few places where there’s way too much inner monologue, which was my main beef with the other book. Even Marko tells her at one point, “No thinking. . . you promised.” There’s a few really good scenes, particularly their trek up the Eiffel Tower and when Antoine makes himself the third wheel. The sex club was a strange twist though, changing the tone of what had up to then been more of a romance with sex rather than romantic erotica.
The plot twist toward the end was only to show her insecurities and have him do his “I know what’s best” routine some more, which is annoying but apparently necessary in the genre.
I probably would have liked this a little bit more if I’d read it before the Greece one; I know I’m not supposed to compare, but I can’t help it. I still wouldn’t have liked it more, though.
3/5

Atonement
Serious warning: do not read this book without having read the previous ones; it just didn’t work with so much having happened that I haven’t read, and brief mentions aren’t enough. Most of what happens here is how the three are dealing with what happened in the earlier stories.
What I do get is that a married couple have invited another man to bed with them; the two guys have been friends for years. But it’s not just so he can get it on with the wife while the husband watches; the two men are lovers with each other as well. In his inner monologue the husband isn’t so sure about this, his objections being more about his new bisexuality than jealousy. And the friend can’t understand that she actually loves him just as much and is treating him like a second husband. A lot of his introspection deals with how weird the situation is for him.
And yes, there’s so much introspection! No wonder this book is so long. In fact, this story is all introspection and sex except for his dad visiting and her quilting class, along with various parental responses to the unorthodox relationship; nothing much happens until the end. Most of her story deals with her being the happy homemaker and lover to two men, although she does get jealous at the relationship her husband has with his AA sponsor, especially when she learns something that happened in a previous book. . . which of course leads to another long introspection. It is a valid point, though; the people in AA know more about her husband than she does, even though he’s supposed to be more forthcoming with her.
In the end I’m just not sure how I feel about this. Didn’t love it, but liked it enough, mostly because of the funny moments, of which there are a lot. There’s plenty of good writing when it’s not taking forever to get to the point.
3/5

;o)

Book Reviews: Erotic-tock

“Wow! Where did you learn to kiss like that?”
“Marine Corps.”

Fallen
A vampire hunter is captured by his prey, but rather than killing him they turn him into one of them. After finally escaping their torture he goes for revenge. . . then meets his supposed soulmate.
There’s long chapters with the antagonist and his wife, as though trying to humanize him, make him seem like he’s just protecting his family rather than a monster deserving of his fate. From what I gather he was the protagonist of the first in this series, so that’s probably for the new readers like me. For a rich girl Cassie is quite likeable, as is the wife, but the guys were mostly unlikeable; the antihero/deus ex machina was the most interesting, so I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s featured in the next book.
All in all, an okay fantasy story, erotic in very small does.
3/5

His Human Slave
The title says it all: Earth girl is chosen as the perfect mate for the leader of an almost annihilated race. He expects complete obedience, she’s not built for that, so they clash while he teaches her to enjoy the sex and the punishments.
I enjoyed the anthropological aspects of an alien learning to deal with a human female, and having even worse luck than human males. There’s a few instances where I chuckled, “Dude. . .” The shower scene was both erotic and hilarious.
I’ve reviewed enough master/slave stuff to be bored by it, so I concentrate on the story and the characters, both of which are excellent here. Especially pleasing to find an author who knows her craft so well; I can definitely see why Zander fell in love with Lamira.
4/5

One Week in Greece
It seems like the new in-thing in erotica is ménages, though oddly enough it’s almost always multiple men with one woman. Wonder if it should be called reverse Mormon.
Businesswoman goes to Mykonos to close a deal on a hotel for her father’s chain, and runs into “the guy” from her past, except he’s now in a homosexual relationship. Turns out they’re both bisexual and they both want her, but make up dumb excuses in their heads to leave her alone, not counting on her own desires.
Early on there’s some inner monologues, and even conversations, that lasted too long, making me want to skip. Thankfully that disappeared as it went on, but all three of them—more so the guys—do way too much thinking. And oddly enough for something listed under erotica rather than romance, there isn’t much sex going on. I would call it a romance—albeit between three people—with some sex rather than a romantic work of erotica.
Once they’ve finally gotten out of their own way, I loved the relationship between the three of them. Unlike most books, I can read about them talking as they take in the sights for as long as they want, because it all sounds so fun. The humor and good cheer carried this story.
4/5

The Last Resort
A child bounty hunter—she kidnaps kids that were abducted by parents who didn’t have custody, so she’s a good guy—gets stuck in a snowstorm after her latest mission and, after being crashed into, is rescued by a couple of brothers who are renovating a hotel, along with about twenty construction workers. Love ensues between her and one of the brothers.
She’s an ex-Marine with abandonment issues. Not a typical heroine. (BTW, I was a Marine and I don’t worry about that “always a Marine” nonsense.) He’s never met anyone like her and can’t stay away, which either annoys or concerns his brother—or both. It may be because I just got through watching the series again, but she reminds me of Wynonna Earp: a giggly badass. So of course despite all her issues and quirks I love her. She’s a complex character—maybe a little too complex—so I’m enjoying the game between them, while realizing in real life they’d probably piss each other off so much. Even better, this is one of those rare situations where I actually like the male character too. Not that I usually hate them, I’m just indifferent, concentrating on the female lead. This guy I would like as a buddy.
Obviously if she hadn’t been trapped this story would have never happened, so as a plot device it’s fine. Interesting to think of a baby as a wild card, both drawing them closer and driving them apart. And it has to be said, that little toddler is probably the best character in the entire book!
4/5

;o)

Book Reviews: Suns, Violins, Planets, and Song

Sunrise, Sunset
A Florida woman with balcony views shoots the sunrise and sunset. Her boyfriend and then other people add poems or words to the photos. Simple premise, elegantly done.
Enjoyed the story of each sunset being done by a famous painter, trying to figure out which one it looked like. No surprise that one went first.
“I never met a sunset I didn’t like. It means dinner’s almost ready.” Nice.
As expected, there’s a lot of rebirth and “life goes on” with the sunrise, while sunset is an opportunity to reflect. Other themes include gratitude and, of course, religion.
I’m sure most people would find these photographs great. As a professional photographer for over 25 years, I could quibble about that, but what would be the point?
Yet despite the preeeety pictures I found myself getting bored halfway through. Don’t try to read/look at this in one sitting.
3/5

Violin
Rather than a history of the violin, this is ten essays on various subjects, some a lot more fun than others.
Starts right off with how the violin was widely considered an instrument of the devil; now we know where Charlie Daniels got that idea. Another chapter talks about the violin in fiction—Sherlock Holmes made the list!—but probably because I was looking forward to it so much it didn’t live up to expectations.
Then the real problems start, with chapter 4. To understand anything that’s been said here you need a ton of knowledge about violin playing, or even music in general, particularly notation. Is this really intended for a general audience? Because I’d say there are a lot more people interested in music who don’t know anything about playing it than those who do. Because of this, entire chapters are of absolutely no interest at all. I’d just seen one of Mozart’s concertos the day before I read about it, and still had no idea what this was talking about. What should have been informative became only boring.
So there’s some interesting tidbits here, but so much of it talks in musical terms that leave us non-musicians in the metaphorical dust.
2.5/5

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better
Stories about how people broke up or were broken up with, obviously not edited, with the author including drawings to punctuate the story. That’s it. It’s like one of those Facebook links that take you to Reddit or some such.
The funniest parts were before and after the main event, like the dedication: “To that one dude, for being such an inspirational dick.” And in the blurbs, “Oh my god, you have a book!” – Hilary’s Mom.
But does she really? Other than some drawings that only highlighted the story—without adding anything original—this was all stuff sent to her. But even the stories weren’t that great. The author states in the forward that she drew a doodle in response to her own breakup, and it made her laugh and feel better; great thought, but I didn’t find much that was funny here. Sure, there were a few laughable instances, but most were either sad or simply mean.
2/5

Planet Song
An advanced long-lived race of fish base their entire civilization and economy on music, particularly sounds made by living beings. Having found the ultimate song—humpback whales—they come to Earth to take some home, in a story obviously inspired by the fourth Star Trek movie. (With a small touch of Harlan Ellison’s original draft of City on the Edge of Forever, where sound could be addicting.)
This is written on a huge scale, taking place over hundreds of years and having around thirty points of view. The main character seems to be one of the very few females of the Fahr species, who manages to work her way into a position of power and then just as quickly loses it. There’s a lot of political wrangling, both within the alien ship and the humans who finally figure out there’s trouble out there. Telescope technology is a fun running theme.
But for such a huge scope there isn’t all the much that takes place; most of it is talking. Thankfully there’s a lot of small touches of humor, and while it never gets boring I wish there could have been more to it. There’s an appendix that explains some of the aspects of the Fahr race that seemed incomprehensible while reading this book, so it might have been more helpful at the beginning.
There’s no actual ending, but since at the start it tells you this is the first of a trilogy, I didn’t mind.
3.5/5

Improper Conduct
The rich daughter of a Chicago politician runs to her first love to help her find her runaway sister. He cons her into having sex with him, not that she’s at all reluctant. In addition to that he makes her live the life of the homeless people she’s encountering—well, he cheats a bit—rather than go right out and find the sister, who’s in danger. He’s a bit of an ass, but then she’s no prize either. By the end they understand each other better, show they regret the times they acted like jerks, and come together. . . and oh yeah, remember about the sister in danger.
This was kinda bland. Can’t think of much to say about it. Actually a good story frame for the silly romance, but they spent so much time denying their feelings I got exasperated.
3/5

;o)

Book Reviews: Ero-tick

Hotel Hookup: Chicago
First I’ve read of this series that obviously takes place in different cities, apparently featuring a one night stand that despite all efforts might turn into something more.
It doesn’t take long to realize I’m not the target demographic here, as Hannah goes bra shopping, which takes FOREVER. So bored I almost gave up on it. There’s so much build-up that this feels like a short story that later got expanded.
Wasn’t sold on the character either. Hannah pretends to be a deep thinker, but she’s quite superficial, especially around men. She’s only interested in looks, but that’s fair, since she certainly doesn’t mind being called a beautiful girl. . . or she might mind if she wasn’t so hot for the guy saying it.
At least the hookup scene was excellent, which only reiterates my belief that so much of this was unnecessary. Less is more here.
2.5/5

The Beginning: I Bet My Wife
A married couple gives in to their sexual urges, which sends her in the arms of other men while her husband waits at home, alternately turned on by what he imagines is being done to her and yet none-too-thrilled, especially when the guy in question is his archrival at work.
Not exactly a new story: be careful what you wish for—as far as sexy wives are concerned—has been around for centuries, and everyone knows what’s going to happen.
The writing isn’t that great, though it’s probably helped by being first person. Unfortunately that first person is the husband, so we don’t get the first-hand account of the sex scenes. Couldn’t help but think this should have been better, or at least put a twist on the same old story.
2.5/5

Bottoms Up
Woman in Tucson who just got fired and has a stalker walks into a bar; what happens then isn’t a joke, unless you count all the drink puns.
Lexi is a little flighty and neurotic, but oddly enough that makes her more endearing. The further the story goes the more adventurous she gets, especially with locations involving the word pool. Oddly enough, the first sex scene isn’t written with nearly the same style as the rest; almost stilted, choppy. Luckily after that it gets better. There’s a few fun side characters, like her best friend who’s engaged to a Brit; of course they walk in on the new couple at the worst time. Unfortunately the villain is so one-dimensional it hardly seemed worth including him. And of course there has to be a girl from Justin’s past to pop up and make a misunderstanding.
Cute, but no big deal. At least it’s somewhat funny, especially the drink names. The hot sex scenes are the highlight.
3.5/5

Blind Seduction
Dominant husband takes submissive wife to a sex retreat, blindfolding her from the moment they’re in the car and giving us the first part of the title. Once there the couple expands their sexual power games in small increments while listening to others’ stories. One guy wants her more than the rules allow.
Though I’m not much for the erotic power genre, I enjoyed this. The couple seems to have the perfect combination of adventurism and trust that only love can achieve. Leslie’s a fantastic character, from her desire for submission to her fortitude in escaping a kidnapping attempt. The subplot with the bad guy hardly seemed necessary, though it did show her strength. Had this just been about the sex it would have been just as good.
And the sex scenes were plenty good, including some interesting psychology into the Dom/sub relationship. A few times their games were interrupted by stories told to them by others, which at the time felt like filler, though it did make it easier to understand what the main characters were going through.
4/5

High Class—VIP Desire Agency, Book 2
Australian call girl doesn’t want to admit she’s in love with client; client tries to win her over with money and not taking no for an answer. In real life she’d be calling the police, but because this is a romance, guess what happens?
Despite the not-likely plot setting, there’s nothing here that isn’t typical. I might have been better convinced If there’d actually been a sex scene for her with someone other than him, considering she is an escort. Yet at the beginning she leaves the man who bought her time to go off into an empty room with this guy she apparently can’t say no to.
The romance is equally bland, with the usual misunderstandings and lack of communication. I don’t know if it would even be called a romance; if he wasn’t so rich and handsome, his behavior would be labeled stalkerish, especially when he shows up at the hotel near the end. The best part was their backgrounds, opening up about why they’d become so closed off emotionally, but that hardly overtook how bored and unwilling I was to suspend all belief for most of this.
2.5/5

;o)